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in manhattan in 1967. i say that rarely in the boston public library, but i was. these are two images from my youth. we have similar images of new york and boston in the 1970s as well. the bottom image is gerald ford denying new york for a successful bailout. indeed, new york was very much headed for the trash heap of history. the city had been hemorrhaging by the thousands. it was not automobile production in detroit, it was production in new york city. and that was decimated by globalization and new technology. the city had been caught in a spiral of disorder and rising crime rate. racial conflicts just like here in boston, and the fiscal situation had gotten out of control with budgets that were far too high for the city to afford. it looked as if new york was going to go back to the weeds. like this image of jimmy carter wandering through the wasteland, and it really seemed as if the planet of the apes image of the statue of liberty rising was possible. with the cities were things that as time had come and gone, the future of the city's seemed dim because their original reason has largely
the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel entitled, what's next for women featuring anita hill, and arose in, and madeline kahn in. this is about an hour. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. such a pleasure to see you all year at what is absolutely one of my favorite advance in the city every year, the boss and books festival. i am co-host of radio boston. [applause] >> thank you very much. if you don't listen to this show i'm going to give a shameless plug. 3:00 p.m. monday through friday and, of course, very proud to be a presenting partner for boston but festival because this spirit that brings literally tens of thousands of us together on a day like this inquiry investigation exploration, love of learning and literature, it is a natural combination for the city of boston, boston but festival, and w. b. you are. i'm honored and proud to be here, especially for this panel. and before i introduce the three amazing women who are sitting to my right, a couple of quick reminders. one is that cell phones, if you have already been given that reminder, please turn them off. at the
for our panel. [applause] >> up next booktv takes you to the fourth annual boston book festival for a panel called the future of reading. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon. my name is amy ryan, president of the boston public library and is an honor and pleasure to welcome you to the boston public library for the boston book festival. i would like to thank all the staff, particularly the abrupt porter, founder of the boston book festival for this amazing lineup this weekend of content rich programs. [applause] >> you can imagine my intense interest in this program, the future of reading and all of us in the library world are. i look forward to hearing your comments and what i would like to do is introduce the moderator, said campbell. [applause] >> it is my pleasure to be here today and i would like to start by thanking debbie and her team for putting on a great event. it is wonderful to spend the day here. very exciting for me to be on this particular panel because it cuts to the heart of what this event is all about, reading. and what the future of reading
. and the strange way of her family, she was sent to a fancy finishing school in boston. were she was taught to dance well and to become a witty conversationalist and a striking young woman. in 1864, she had her debut in new york. and she came back here a few years later. nothing could outdo the flurry of excitement when she returned to new york in the fall of 1860. the city shimmered with news that the prince of wales was coming to visit. in his honor, a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society than was very excited. excited couples who had paid $10 apiece arrive at the academy of music. women curl their hair and they had special nods to acquaintances and friends. precisely at 10:00 p.m., they prayed and sang god save the queen and the slight friends stepped into the room. for two hours, nearly 3000 of new york's finest citizens rushed like schoolgirls to meet him. in a mad crush, the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously. the guests rushed to follow and they piled their plates with lobster salad, and filled their glasses with champagne. at 2:00 a.m., the dance f
in colonial boston, you can imagine what that might have been like. when i was writing about franklinite realize a large part of the story was going to consist of franklin growing old because he became america's emissary to france during the american revolution at the age of 70. i started writing about franklin when i was around 40 and i really wondered whether i was going to be able to understand what it was like to grow old and infirm which was a large part of a franklin story. partly for this reason, i decided, and this is carried through in my other book, i decided to tell my stories, i try to relate the lives of my characters as much as possible through the perceptions, the words of people who knew them. my books tend to have more eyewitness stuff than some others. if i have a choice between writing a scene in my own words and writing a scene in the words of somebody who was mayor, i will tend toward the person who was there. that conveys a certain authenticity and it relieves me of the burden really of sort of providing the authority because the question anyone should have is how d
of this too is kennedy had around in a close-knit group. they are often called the boston mafia or the kennedy mafia or whatever. there were people who went back of the political career and robustly be generally come committee paid to democratic politics. but in the ex-con in the cabinet committee surrounded himself with a remarkably centrist range of people. several republicans. director of central intelligence , robert mcnamara who is not overtly political. douglas had actually made sure a lot of his advisers were actually very centrist. he was not getting left-leaning partisan people when he was making important decisions. >> host: that pascua must question the taste or do dedicated many years to the miller center of public affairs and the recordings project. talk about the value of these tapes, but also the potential pitfalls. some have said because the tapes are so wonderful that we can focus too much on them and there might be a danger to that. >> guest: absolutely. as you point out at the university of virginia we've been working on these tapes, all as sixth president eagerly taped arou
, but springfield was a city where people who couldn't get a job in boston, couldn't get a job in new york would come to springfield, a city of about 170,000. and everybody was either irish, italian or they were french- canadian. and it was important to them to know where you came from. i said, well, i came from senegal valley. what? [laughter] but that was an education, just being in springfield. and this country is, it's about the, it is the great meeting place of people from all over the world. and somehow they get here, and they're free. it's -- and once, well, it's a fantastic accomplishment. i started to say america's a wonderful country, but it's -- [inaudible] >> there are some, of course, they probably don't know what they're talking about, but there are some that criticize some of your books that some of the characters are one-dimensional or simplistic or play to stereotypes. >> i think that with pride. so would dickens. [laughter] try to find some complicateed side of the great lawyer in -- [inaudible] i'll send you a postcard, the name are come to me. the name will come to me. i brus
takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still out c. davis is the author on "in depth" on booktv on c-span 2. a better after we have with some questions have been preapproval shape as now. we have an hour and half program. we'll be right back. >> host: and we're back live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city. this is booktv on c-span 2. mr. davis come you say when it comes to your career, your writing career that she give a lot of credit to join davis. who is that? >
, boston tea party and so on. and then of the american civil war. we knew almost everything about that. we had the battle of antitee tunnel and gettysburg and so on. into when i came here in 1957, i found i really knew a lot more about the revolution and the civil war than colleagues here, students and academics. but we never heard a word about the war of 1812. it was not mentioned, and it was not in our history. any idea why that should be? >> the speaker noted that he was educated in australia, and there was quite a comprehensive education on the topics of the american revolution and the american civil war but almost nothing on the war of 1812, and why might that be? well, the british did not tend to regard the american war of 1812 as a particular significant war at all. for the british, this was just a side show in the global war with napoleon. so for them the war of 1812 is not as important as the one that's happening on the european continent, so that might have something to do with what was taught in australia. but the fact of the matter is, it doesn't taught very much here either. i
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9